women

Pad distribution and hygiene packages change lives!

Primary and middle school students celebrate with their new menstrual kits!

Primary and middle school students celebrate with their new menstrual kits!

Two weeks ago WEEMA International, in partnership with Studio Samuel, distributed 400 reusable sanitary pads at Samura Primary and Middle School and left an additional 200 for future students. This distribution was accompanied by presentations, led by peer mentors, on how to use the pads as well as general information about hygiene and menstrual management.

Evidence shows that lack of access to menstrual supplies (and knowledge!) leads to girls' school absenteeism and drop-out.  One female student explained how these pads will transform her school life:

"I want to thank WEEMA for giving us this reusable pads so that we can focus on our education. It's been a problem for me to focus on  school activities during menstruation because of fear, pain and embarrassment. I didn't come to school during menstruation but now that I have this materials with me, it won't be a problem anymore."

In addition to the pad distribution, we'd like to send a big shout out to Cindy and her supporters for spearheading hygiene packages for boys. Her packages included underwear, toothbrushes, soap and toilet paper for over 200 students.  Gratitude!

Saruma school boys pick up their hygiene packages from Cindy and her daughter.

Saruma school boys pick up their hygiene packages from Cindy and her daughter.

This demonstration taught 400 girls how to use and wash their reusable pads and maintain proper hygiene.

This demonstration taught 400 girls how to use and wash their reusable pads and maintain proper hygiene.

Happy World Health Worker Week!

HEWS WW.jpg

 

We're taking this opportunity to acknowledge and thank all of the global health workers who work tirelessly every day to care for families around the world.  We appreciate you!

Learn more about World Health Worker Week: April 1-7, 2018

WEEMA truly values the dedication and commitment of Ethiopia's frontline health care workers, Health Extension Workers (HEWs). Together, in partnership with D-Tree International and Ethiopia's Ministry of Health, we are developing and implementing a comprehensive mobile tool to empower these women to provide high quality maternal child health care.  While our pilot program is located in the Kembata-Temabro Zone, we plan to see this program scale to all 35,000 HEWs serving rural communities throughout Ethiopia.   HEWs- with these phones in hand- save lives.

Beyond the Fence at Mudula Kindergarten

IMG_5377.JPG

Blog post written by Kate Murphy, WEEMA's Social Media Guru, as she shares from her recent trip.

 

WEEMA Standing in the playground of Mudula Kindergarten, the last thing I am expecting to hear is "Hey! What's your name?" in giggling English. I spin around and glance at the fence surrounding the KG to discover the source of the voice. A playful smile peaks through the wooden slats.

After sharing my name, I am asked a slew of follow up questions:

Where am I from?

How old am I?

Is this my first time in Ethiopia?

After each answer, I fire back questions in English. I learn that I am fortunate enough to meet Bebeta, a fifth grader whose English rivals any I have heard spoken in the small town of Mudula. It only makes sense that English is her favorite subject, a language that she is already mastering at the age of eleven. She has just come from filling up a jerrycan at a water point nearby.

After I snap Bebeta's photo with her friends, I share the photo with them. The group erupts in laughter.

Girls like Bebeta are the reason that WEEMA continues to focus on development from many angles; so that eleven year olds can spend their time working towards their educational goals instead of walking hours to collect water!